CMS Patients Over Paperwork E&M Coding Introductory Video

CMS Patients Over Paperwork E&M Coding Introductory Video



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CMS heard from doctors and clinicians all over the country that documentation was needlessly burdensome, wasn’t improving patient care, and was actually having a negative impact on patient care. We are proposing to streamline the system of office-based E&M codes and reducing the requirements of documentation. Watch now to hear about what we are doing to put #patientsoverpaperwork.

– Hi, I'm Seema Verma,
administrator for the Centers for
Medicare & Medicaid Services, or CMS. You may have heard last year
that President Trump put out an executive order that
required all federal agencies to evaluate existing regulations and identify those that should
be repealed or modified. In response, CMS began its Patients Over Paperwork
initiative to reduce regulations
that are not contributing to patient safety, quality,
or program integrity but instead are only increasing
our health-care costs. Over the past year,
we have traveled the country talking to providers in all
types of treatment settings, and one thing we heard
consistently from clinicians is that the documentation
requirements imposed by CMS are so unnecessarily burdensome,
redundant, and time-consuming that they are impacting
the doctor-patient relationship so critical to providing
quality care. This administration
has listened, and we are responding. CMS has proposed bold reforms to the evaluation
and management, or E/M, coding requirements in order to reduce burden
on providers so that they can spend more time
with their patients and less time staring
at a computer screen. Our proposal
was informed not only by the many conversations
we had with providers but also the CMS team that includes many
practicing physicians. I've asked some of them
to tell you from their own perspective how this reform could impact
patient care. – The current documentation
guidelines for billing purposes have unfortunately resulted in the increasing length
of clinical notes. – I often have
to document things that were already documented
by somebody else, and I also have
to document things that actually don't make
a lot of difference in the care
of my patient. – Doctors spend hours of their
time at the end of each day reentering duplicative data
into their systems because of these outdated
billing requirements. – There's a lot of energy
and dollars spent in coding all of this. It's, I think, often hidden
from the American public. – Updating these guidelines will
help to improve the capacity for health IT to remove
unnecessary burdens. – For us,
it's a foundational part of our Patients Over Paperwork
initiative to really reduce
the administrative burden on practicing clinicians so that they can spend more time
with their patients. – It really is a perfect example
of putting patients first over paperwork. Now, we say over paperwork. Of course,
it's electronic paperwork. And I think sometimes electronic
paperwork is actually worse. – This shift will pave the way
for more efficient, effective use
of electronic health records, where documentation workflows
will be improved to support patient-centered care instead of meeting
billing requirements. – We think this is going to have
some material impact on American costs. – This is a huge step forward and a shift to putting patients
over paperwork. – At CMS, we are prioritizing
patients over paperwork. [bright music]

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